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Mark R. Hemmila, M.D.
Mark R. Hemmila, M.D.
Mark R. Hemmila, M.D.
Associate Professor of Surgery

University of Michigan Health Systems
1500 E. Medical Center Drive
1C421 UH SPC 5033
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5033
biography

Mark R. Hemmila, M.D. is an Associate Professor of Surgery in the Section of General Surgery. He serves as an attending faculty member on the Trauma and Burn Service. Dr. Hemmila received his BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY. Postgraduate study in Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering was performed at Columbia University in NYC, NY. Dr. Hemmila graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School and also completed General Surgery residency at the University of Michigan Medical Center. He is board certified in the specialties of Surgery and Surgical Critical Care.

Dr. Hemmila's clinical interests are focused on general surgery. He provides surgical care for trauma or burn injured patients and patients with acute general surgery problems. His elective practice includes, but is not limited to, treatment of benign or neoplastic disease of the GI tract, hernia surgery, spine exposure, and laparoscopic procedures. He also provides critical care services for patients in the trauma and burn ICU with an interest in patients with severe respiratory failure.

Dr. Hemmila is funded by the NIH as a recipient of an NIGMS/AAST/ACS joint mentored clinical scientist K award. His current laboratory research is focused on the role of lipopolysaccharide binding protein in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative pneumonia. He is also engaged in pursuing investigations on the use of nanoemulsion compounds in the treatment of burn wounds as they relate to infection and inflammation. His clinical research is centered on outcomes research and he is actively engaged in helping to create a Trauma Quality Improvement Program under the auspices of the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma.